Articles Tagged with Negligent Driver

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A Manhattan jury recently awarded a 24-year-old woman $71 million for injuries sustained in a 2012 auto accident. The award consisted of $5 million for past pain and suffering, $6 million for future pain and suffering, and $60 million to cover medical needs for the rest of her life. The verdict came after a three-week-long jury trial.

Three college students were on their way to Cornell College when the driver fell asleep behind the wheel, veered into oncoming traffic, and crashed into a minivan. An elderly woman in the van was pronounced dead at the hospital; the driver and her son suffered non-life threatening injuries. The three college students were treated at the hospital; one passenger (the plaintiff in this case) suffered a fracture of her lumbar spine. According to her attorney, the woman now walks with leg braces, but still suffers from neurogenic bowel.

Serious injuries are always accompanied by extensive medical bills. The innocent victim may be unable to return to work. However, lawsuits take time to reach a settlement. A lawsuit cash advance can provide significant financial relief. These advances, known as lawsuit funding, allow a family time to heal while they pay the medical expenses and other important bills. With the financial pressure removed, there is no need to resolve any case for less than the full case value.

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In February, four people were killed and one critically injured in a three-vehicle crash in Des Plaines, Illinois.

At the time of the fatal crash, police said the driver of a Mercedes was traveling in excess of 100 mph when he slammed into a Chevy Impala as it was turning in to a parking lot. The impact sent the Impala spinning nearly 200 feet, crashing into a Toyota Highlander. The impact was so severe nearly four feet of the front of the car was blown apart, according to reports. A couple and their 20-year-old daughter inside the Impala were killed. The couple leaves behind a 10-year-old son and a 15-year-old daughter. The driver of the Mercedes was also killed in the crash; his passenger survived with a traumatic brain injury. Two people in the Toyota suffered minor injuries.

An investigation later revealed that the Mercedes driver was actually driving 135 mph, and toxicology results showed he had a blood alcohol content almost three-times the legal limit. It was also determined that he had received at least nine tickets for speeding and other offenses in the past five years. Despite his license being suspended four times, he managed to narrowly avoid automatic revocation.

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Every year, thousands of people receive that phone call we all dread—news that a loved one has been killed in an auto accident. The news is not only a sudden shock, but emotionally and physically debilitating. Even before the reality of it all wears off, many families will face unforeseen financial challenges as they are suddenly forced to deal with medical expenses, funeral and burial expenses, and additional financial hurdles due to lost income.

While no one can ever put a value on a life, it is important for the family to understand their legal rights to pursue a wrongful death claim. An experienced attorney can help guide victims through their legal options to recover the maximum possible compensation.

The driver of a Chevy Impala was turning left into a parking lot when he was struck by another vehicle speeding at an estimated 100 mph. The crash sent the Impala spinning at least 75 feet into a Toyota Highlander. The Impala was so mangled that it was hardly recognizable; the Mercedes that hit it was crushed to at least three feet shorter than normal, according to reports.

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Motorists have a duty to operate a motor vehicle in a safe and reasonable manner. This duty can be breached if a driver is exceeding the speed limit, following at an unsafe distance, driving while distracted, or otherwise driving in an unreasonable or unsafe manner.

On December 1, a high school senior tweeted “Seatbelt warnings are smart for cars. You could just be driving and someone else could be the dumbass. Be safe.” Less than two hours later he was killed in an auto accident, but not because he was speeding or driving while distracted, and not because he wasn’t wearing a seatbelt.

The Jacksonville Sheriff’s Office said the teen was stopped at an intersection when the driver of a Nissan minivan ran a red light at a “high rate of speed”, jumped the center concrete median, and slammed into his Honda Accord. Those two vehicles veered into the path of a commercial gasoline tanker truck, pushing it into a Lexus.

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With fatal auto accidents, lawsuits are often filed against a negligent driver, but in cases such as the following, a bar can be sued for a wrongful death caused by a drunk driver if there is evidence that the bar illegally served alcohol to the driver prior to the crash.

The husband of a Colorado state trooper killed in the line of duty has filed a wrongful death lawsuit against the drunk driver who hit her and the bar that allegedly served him alcohol while he was already visibly intoxicated.

Last November a driver hit the trooper as she was trying to wave him to pull over after citizen reports that he was driving drunk. Prosecutors said that after hitting the trooper, the man, a retired colonel with the U.S. Army, tried to hide evidence, including bottles. His blood-alcohol content was estimated at 0.199 percent at the time of the crash, nearly four times the legal impaired limit of .05 for drivers in Colorado. Reports stated that he was still legally drunk more than five hours after the crash.