Articles Tagged with Legal Finance

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Lawsuit Financial is the company many plaintiffs turn to for a cash advance while waiting for their settlement or day in court.

In the event you are the victim of a personal injury and going head-to-head into battle with a big corporation or insurance company, you should be prepared for a lengthy litigation process that includes the defendant denying delaying, and defending the claim. First, and foremost, you need to hire an experienced attorney who can help obtain the best possible settlement. Once you have retained an attorney and the lawsuit is filed, if you are experiencing financial pressure or maybe injuries have left you unable to work and earn an income, you may be a perfect candidate for lawsuit funding.

Lawsuit funding is a means for plaintiffs to play the waiting game rather than settling for less than full case value. While often confused with a loan, this is definitely not the case. A lawsuit cash advance requires no credit checks or employment verification, and with the appropriate case documentation, funding can be used as quickly as 24 hours. The major difference between lawsuit funding and a loan is that a lawsuit cash advance is risk-free.

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On February 14, 2016, a teen snowboarder jumped 30 feet off a ski lift at Sugar Mountain Resort in North Carolina, to avoid freezing to death. He suffered frost bite and broken bones.

His family recently filed a lawsuit against the ski resort. According to court documents, the lift operator initiated daily closing protocol, including removing the safety gate from the lift, which would automatically stop the lift if a passenger or skier did not disembark at the top. Because of that, the young man went around the bullwheel and began going back down the mountain. When the lift was shut down for the evening, the chair came to a halt over a heavily wooded area, nearly 30 feet in the air, leaving the teen stranded.

Snow-making equipment and high winds drowned out his cries for help. After stranded for about two hours, and worried about surviving the night, the teen jumped, falling to the frozen ground below. He was knock unconscious when he fell, but eventually came to and crawled in pain until he reached help, according to the lawsuit.

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Head-on collisions often cause death because both cars hit with extreme opposing force. These accidents are often due to miscalculating the speed and distance of the oncoming car or veering into an oncoming lane due to speeding, reckless driving, distractions, or drunk driving.

Witnesses told police the driver of a white Yukon had been weaving in and out of traffic at a high rate of speed prior to a head-on crash that killed a 7-year-old boy and a 25-year-old woman.

The crash occurred when a white SUV drifted into the lane of a Mazda, striking it and forcing the Mazda into a spin before it was struck by an oncoming Dodge Durango. Police said neither driver had a chance to avoid the impact.

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On the night of August 10, natural gas built up in a basement utility room at an apartment complex in Silver Springs, Maryland, leading to an explosion and fire that killed seven people. Several others were injured as they jumped from balconies or descended down burning, crumbling staircases.

Investigators are still working to unravel what caused the disaster, but say the explosion was caused by a gas leak in the meter room of the building that built up until the explosion was sparked. The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) said a complete investigation is ongoing and expected to continue into next year.

In the meantime, more lawsuits have been filed alleging that blame rests with the company that managed the complex and the utility that supplied it with natural gas. According to the lawsuits, both defendants had been warned “on several occasions” about the smell of gas in apartments in the summer months before the tragedy. “Defendants deliberately disregarded the danger to the property’s residents, and undertook no steps to repair the condition,” say the new lawsuits. The suits contend that the gas company failed to ensure the security of residents by not: repairing the gas leak, properly investigating and identifying the gas leak, warning residents, and/or calling for an evacuation. The suit also claims that the utility failed to perform routine inspections that would have uncovered the potential dangers and saved the lives and property of residents.