Posted On: June 21, 2011 by Mark Bello of Lawsuit Financial Corp.

Lawsuit Funding on Your Wrongful Termination Lawsuit

Wrongful termination or employment discrimination happens when an employee is unfairly fired or laid. Being fired is troublesome, but the impact on one’s life, family, health, and finance can be devastating. Filing a wrongful termination / discrimination lawsuit is a way for an employee to seek relief, but it can also take a long time to settle adding more emotional and financial stress.

Most plaintiffs involved in wrongful termination or employment discrimination lawsuit are not aware that they can apply for lawsuit funding, a non-recourse pre-settlement cash advance before their lawsuit is settled. Lawsuit funding is considered a secured non-recourse because if the lawsuit reaches a final verdict in favor of the defendant, the lawsuit cash advance is forgiven; the plaintiff is absolved from repayment. Plaintiff only repays the lawsuit funding if, and when they win or settle the case.

If you have been wrongfully terminated or discharged, here are four easy steps in seeking lawsuit funding.

1. Complete the quick and easy application on line or via phone.
2. A representative from the lawsuit funding company will contact your attorney to request necessary documentation to review your request.
3. Once a completed application is received, the underwriters will review all documentation and make a determination. This process will take approximately 24 hours.
4. If approved, you and your attorney will sign the lawsuit funding agreement. Then funds can be wired to your bank account.

There are no upfront costs or monthly payments with lawsuit funding. Credit and employment history are not a factor. The lawsuit cash advance is paid back, plus fees, from the proceeds of the final recovery once the lawsuit is resolved.

By providing lawsuit funding, Lawsuit Financial helps plaintiffs to get relief from financial issues and helps them resist financial pressures to take low settlement offers. Lawsuit funding gives plaintiffs and their attorney the time required to induce the utmost attainable value for the case.